Friday, June 7

Love this post from Brett Contreras on progressive overload. This is how real progress is made in the gym. It’s a methodical process that works in waves over time. It’s not maxing out every day. It’s not sacrificing form or technique to set a personal record.

If you want true, long-lasting progress start to enjoy the process and remember that technique trumps everything!

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I’ve been trying to convey the importance of progressive overload to my clients at Glute Lab lately, and it’s made me realize that it’s a poorly understood concept by the masses. Many people think it simply means maxing out every session, which doesn’t come close to encompassing what progressive overload truly entails. ⁣ ⁣ For starters, it can involve any rep range. If you do hip thrusts with 155lbs for 3 sets of 10 and in two months, you do 3 sets of 10 with 175lbs, you’ve utilized progressive overload. If you increase your 1RM deadlift by 30lbs in a year, you’ve utilized progressive overload. If you can do 1 set of 50 bodyweight lunges, and in a month, you can do 100, you’ve utilized progressive overload. It can involve pyramids, too. Let’s say you do sets of 10, 8, 6, and 15 reps with 135, 155, 175, and 95lbs on your barbell glute bridges, and in 3 weeks, you get sets of 12, 10, 8, and 15 with the same loads, you’ve utilized progressive overload. If you could military press 65lbs for 8, 7, and 5 reps, and in 3 weeks, you increase your 3-set total by 4 reps (say 10, 8, and 6 reps), you’ve utilized progressive overload. ⁣ ⁣ Progressive overload can involve doing more reps with the same weight, more weight for the same reps, same weight for same reps with greater range of motion or better technique, or more sets with the same weight and reps. ⁣ ⁣ You have to be scientific about it and control the variables. Cutting your chin-ups short to get an extra rep isn’t progressive overload, and neither is rounding your back excessively in order to deadlift 10 more pounds. ⁣ ⁣ It will never happen in a linear fashion; the body works in waves. Milo of Croton is a cute tale used for teaching the concept of progressive overload, but it’s unrealistic. It gets harder to set PRs the longer you’ve been lifting. Eventually, you’ll need to specialize in 1 to 2 lifts at a time in order to make progress, and you’ll need to switch exercises and strategies. It requires 24 hours a day to optimize it since sleep, nutrition, and stress heavily influence recovery and performance. ⁣ #gluteguy #glutelab

A post shared by Bret "Glute Guy" Contreras PhD (@bretcontreras1) on


Workout for Friday, June 7
EMOM 3
3 Hang Power Snatches
Rest 1 min, Increase Weight
EMOM 3
3 Hang Power Snatches
Rest 1 min, Increase Weight
EMOM 3
3 Hang Power Snatches

7 min AMRAP
7 T2B
7 Hang DB Snatches Right Arm
7 Hang DB Snatches Left Arm

CrossFit 616